One Stadium & 2 Clubs.

Even though I am from a country which is not traditionally football mad, I somehow ended up being a complete football nut. One of the best things of studying in Europe is the pro-football culture which I find over here. Recently when I visited a friend of mine in Turin, Italy I had to take…

Rate this:

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

Nostalgic Nihon, Joyful Japan

It’s been two months since I visited Japan, the wonderland (wonder-islands) located in the west bit of the Pacific Ocean. Japan, or Nihon as Japanese people call their country, totally amazed me with a unique blend of traditional customs and modern development in its culture. I have to make a bold statement that this is the most disciplined and most organized society in the world. Wherever I went, the neatness and orderliness simply made me speechless. People were extremely friendly; I didn’t experience any ice-cold barriers between strangers (although the Japanese themselves joke about their ‘fake’ friendliness). Oh the Japanese food… Please forgive me for being a foodie, but every single dish I tried was superb. OK, let me stop saying these empty words and I’ll explain my trip to Japan to you with the following amazing pictures. During the flight from Shanghai to Nagoya, my mom found something really cool on an advertisement brochure. They have stroopwafels in Japan! And the price is really not high. Look at the close friendship between the Netherlands and Japan. Hashtag jealous. The first bus ride from Nagoya to Osaka took us 3 hours. I was too excited that I wanted to see everything literally on my way. This picture is an amusement park in Nagoya. If we had time to chill a bit in there that would be really awesome! To be honest, my first impression of Osaka is that it’s a bit boring. It is a historical city, so I guess it should not be blamed for being old and … dull. Still, it’s a must-go if you are into Japanese history and relevant subjects like that. I changed my mind when I visited the city center of Osaka. Do you know the feeling when you look into the mirror after putting on make up and fancy clothes? I think the city center of Osaka is like crucial decorations. My mom and I were overwhelmed by the ‘iroiro’ (in Japanese it means ‘a variety of’) shops. I even thought about getting some weird ‘cosplay’ costumes! Though tired from walking around Osaka city center, we still saved some enthusiasm for Nara, a lovely little town near Osaka. The nostalgia at Nara immediately brought me to the ancient times. Traditional architectures like the Buddhist temples and Shinto shrines all share a deeply rooted sense of authenticity. There are a lot of deer in Nara. It’s said that deer are the gods of Nara. These deer gods are so cute though! The next day, we went to Kyoto. This is totally my favorite Japanese city! It’s bright, young, also old, colorful, vivid, dynamic, alive, cultural, prosperous and well, let’s just say it’s perfect! I visited a Buddhist temple on the mountain which is called the Kiyomizu (Clear Water) Temple. This is the most amazing temple I’ve ever visited! And guess what! I was guaranteed for getting my Mr. Right from the ‘love stone’! I got it with the help from my mom though… It was my dad’s birthday on that day; in China we usually have noodles for birthday dinner, which means having a long and healthy life. Luckily, we had ramen/noodles for dinner for celebration. It was totally oishii (which means, yummy)! By the way, the blankets in Japanese hotels are pretty weird and uncomfortable… But the rooms are all super clean.   And then we climbed up the Mount Fuji. Haha nope I’m kidding, our bus took us uphills and brought us downhills. Sorry, but we were lazy tourists who only wanted to take pictures. It was foggy in the mountain; it was actually super lucky for us that we could see a bit the shy Mount Fuji under her mysterious veil. We also went to lavender parks at the foot of Mount Fuji. What attracted me was not actually the beautiful landscape, but local products there. Peaches, cherries, and grapes there were like divine. Words cannot describe how delicious they were. My mouth is flooding right now when I’m typing. I’ll just move on to the next part to stop the flood.  …

Rate this:

2014-08-22-18-40-33_deco

A Bite of Summer, A Bit of Food

The past summer has fully satisfied me as a foodie. No matter where you go in the world, food is always an essential and indispensable element of everyday life, making simple ingredients and materials into thousands of millions of delicious miracles. Please scroll down and enjoy the supreme torture (of only seeing the pictures, I guess?) and ultimate temptation. Now I’m wondering if I should indeed write this post, because I am super…

Rate this:

VIDEO0047_0000004865

Metropolitan Impression

When I introduce myself to other people that I come from China, they always ask me, “Which city are you from then? Beijing? Shanghai?” That sounds very interesting as if Beijing and Shanghai are the only metropolitans in China. Lol just kidding! Beijing and Shanghai are, however, my two favorite Chinese metropolitans that I got to visit recently. They are obviously very different from Dutch cities in many aspects. In this blog post you’ll see a bit of what kind of impressions Beijing and Shanghai gave me, and what are the differences I observed during my little trips. 1.Beijing being non-political Hang on. Are you too tired from all the traveling and transportation that messed up the thoughts in your brain?” Haha, thanks for your concern my readers, I am pretty okay and I do feel that Beijing is a very traditional and artistic city. The Tiananmen Square might be too frequently referred to as a political symbol of Beijing, but I don’t think it is necessarily what I’ll agree on. If you take a look further beyond Tiananmen, the Forbidden City is right behind it, and there is a whole Chinese palace to amaze you. Let’s put aside political struggles and alternations of dynasties, and look into the beauty of Chinese traditional architecture. Amazing, isn’t it? Well, there is also modern art in Beijing. 798 Art Zone has been increasingly popular among Chinese young hipsters. Postmodernism is spread in this former Soviet Communist-style industrial factory that was constructed in the middle of the twentieth century. Modern designs make strong contradictions with the old, gray, and torn-out industrial area. I sense no politics in these places, but a rather artistic atmosphere. 2.Shanghai being political You must see the prosperity of Shanghai in these pictures. But wait, I feel as if Shanghai is more political than Beijing. I live near the Bund (外滩), a.k.a the most famous sight of Shanghai for more than a century (How near? I only need to walk for 15 minutes to get there and enjoy the evening view of the romantic Shanghai). Every hour I hear a ‘red song’ (Communist-themed music), which is used on a clock tower; I see Communist mottos very frequently on the streets; there are many Communist sights in Shanghai, including the memorial site of the First Conference of the Chinese Communist Party. I felt that the political atmosphere in Shanghai is stronger. 3.Beijing and Shanghai are too huge compared to Dutch cities You only need 50 minutes by train from The Hague to Amsterdam, even faster if you start from Leiden. Do you know how long it takes to go from Shanghai Hongqiao Airport to Pudong International Airport by underground? 90 minutes! 90 minutes past and you are still in the same city. These metropolitans are indeed too huge. And, look at the crowd… One good thing in China is that you can generally get back to where you were if you turn right, turn right, and turn right again. In Dutch cities, oh my friend, please don’t. In a nutshell, I love cities in both countries. Chinese cities are large and modern; Dutch cities are delicate and adorable. There are certainly a lot more cities for me to visit, and I’ll keep you updated.   – by Xueyan Xing (coming all the way from China; studying at Leiden University College The Hague)

Rate this: